Articles myTukar Auto Tips: Clean the Interior of your Car Effectively and prevent COVID-19

myTukar Auto Tips: Clean the Interior of your Car Effectively and prevent COVID-19

Published:

Twitter

With the spread of COVID-19 continuing to widen in the country, the Malaysian Government has declared a 14-day Restricted Movement Control mandate to contain the pandemic. Companies across the country are required to close operations for the stipulated period and encourage empluyees on ‘Working Remotely’.

 

For those who couldn’t just sit, wash hands and stay indoors due to work or other obligations, take extra caution whenever you are in public. e-Hailing drivers and people who are involved in delivery business would still be required to continue their daily activities.

 

This article offers some tips on how to sanitize your car to make sure it is free of germs and bacteria.  Most people in the country is already practicing the habit of washing hands and cleaning, disinfecting relevant contact points to prevent from the Covid-19 spread. But what about the inside of your car?

 

Best techniques to sanitize the inside of a car

 

e-hailing drivers and even the general public should take necessary precautions in this heighten pandemic period. And it begins with the interior of the car.    

 

If you or someone else who has been in your car shows symptoms of the illness, you should clean frequently touched surfaces, including the steering wheel, door handles, shift lever, any buttons or touch screens, wiper and turn signal stalks, passenger and driver door armrests, rear door handles and seat adjusters. e-hailing and cab drivers who are driving their own cars or rented cars, or who live somewhere with many cases of Covid-19, it is very important to regularly clean the surfaces mentioned above. It is advisable to clean the surfaces after dropping off a passenger.

 

Sanitizing and cleaning a car’s interior is not that difficult, but a car’s interior is less durable than a work table or a laptop and you want to protect the above surfaces in the car without damaging them. So what do you do? Don’t worry, with some exceptions, there are many cleaners found in the house that kill the Covid-19 virus in a car without damaging its interior.

 

First up is the common alcohol solutions, which contains at least 70 percent alcohol. This is effective against Covid virus, according to health governing organizations. For the most part, nearly every interior surface of a vehicle can be cleaned with isopropyl alcohol. Isopropyl alcohol is applicable and safe to be used on a car’s surfaces from plastic trim to painted chrome to imitation leather. Whether it’s plastic, painted surface or leather, there’s no signs of degradation when exposed to pure isopropyl alcohol. On the other hand, car leathers and imitation leathers with urethane coatings can be cleaned with alcohol, but over time they are  susceptible to damage and discoloration. Therefore, all-leather interiors require the use of a proper leather cleaner and conditioner.

 

Whatever you do, don’t use bleach or hydrogen peroxide on the inside of your car. Bleach kills covid virus but it will likely damage your car’s upholstery. Also, ammonia-based cleaners are not advisable on car touch screens, as they can damage their anti-glare and anti-fingerprint coatings.

 

If the above chemicals are too scientific, you still have the always dependable soap and water. Constant washing, but don’t overdo it, with soap and water can also destroy the virus. In addition, soap and water are also safe for most car interiors, especially fabrics and older leather that may have begun to crack.

 

Lastly, when cleaning the interior be sure to use a microfiber cloth on all surfaces. A microfiber is made of a fabric that consists of tiny little loops to capture and sweep away dirt and dust particles before they can scratch delicate or shiny surfaces.

 

Once you’re finished cleaning, don’t forget to wash your hands before and after driving.


Suggested Articles

Published:

Twitter

Published:

Twitter

Published:

Twitter

Published:

Twitter

Articles myTukar Auto Tips: Clean the Interior of your Car Effectively and prevent COVID-19

myTukar Auto Tips: Clean the Interior of your Car Effectively and prevent COVID-19

Published:

Twitter

With the spread of COVID-19 continuing to widen in the country, the Malaysian Government has declared a 14-day Restricted Movement Control mandate to contain the pandemic. Companies across the country are required to close operations for the stipulated period and encourage empluyees on ‘Working Remotely’.

 

For those who couldn’t just sit, wash hands and stay indoors due to work or other obligations, take extra caution whenever you are in public. e-Hailing drivers and people who are involved in delivery business would still be required to continue their daily activities.

 

This article offers some tips on how to sanitize your car to make sure it is free of germs and bacteria.  Most people in the country is already practicing the habit of washing hands and cleaning, disinfecting relevant contact points to prevent from the Covid-19 spread. But what about the inside of your car?

 

Best techniques to sanitize the inside of a car

 

e-hailing drivers and even the general public should take necessary precautions in this heighten pandemic period. And it begins with the interior of the car.    

 

If you or someone else who has been in your car shows symptoms of the illness, you should clean frequently touched surfaces, including the steering wheel, door handles, shift lever, any buttons or touch screens, wiper and turn signal stalks, passenger and driver door armrests, rear door handles and seat adjusters. e-hailing and cab drivers who are driving their own cars or rented cars, or who live somewhere with many cases of Covid-19, it is very important to regularly clean the surfaces mentioned above. It is advisable to clean the surfaces after dropping off a passenger.

 

Sanitizing and cleaning a car’s interior is not that difficult, but a car’s interior is less durable than a work table or a laptop and you want to protect the above surfaces in the car without damaging them. So what do you do? Don’t worry, with some exceptions, there are many cleaners found in the house that kill the Covid-19 virus in a car without damaging its interior.

 

First up is the common alcohol solutions, which contains at least 70 percent alcohol. This is effective against Covid virus, according to health governing organizations. For the most part, nearly every interior surface of a vehicle can be cleaned with isopropyl alcohol. Isopropyl alcohol is applicable and safe to be used on a car’s surfaces from plastic trim to painted chrome to imitation leather. Whether it’s plastic, painted surface or leather, there’s no signs of degradation when exposed to pure isopropyl alcohol. On the other hand, car leathers and imitation leathers with urethane coatings can be cleaned with alcohol, but over time they are  susceptible to damage and discoloration. Therefore, all-leather interiors require the use of a proper leather cleaner and conditioner.

 

Whatever you do, don’t use bleach or hydrogen peroxide on the inside of your car. Bleach kills covid virus but it will likely damage your car’s upholstery. Also, ammonia-based cleaners are not advisable on car touch screens, as they can damage their anti-glare and anti-fingerprint coatings.

 

If the above chemicals are too scientific, you still have the always dependable soap and water. Constant washing, but don’t overdo it, with soap and water can also destroy the virus. In addition, soap and water are also safe for most car interiors, especially fabrics and older leather that may have begun to crack.

 

Lastly, when cleaning the interior be sure to use a microfiber cloth on all surfaces. A microfiber is made of a fabric that consists of tiny little loops to capture and sweep away dirt and dust particles before they can scratch delicate or shiny surfaces.

 

Once you’re finished cleaning, don’t forget to wash your hands before and after driving.

Suggested Articles

Published:


Twitter

Published:


Twitter

Published:


Twitter

Published:


Twitter